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Public Works


Storm Water Education

Each month we will post a new tip to help educate you and your neighbors about how to keep our storm water drains clean.

June 2014 Tip #7 - Litter

May 2014 Tip #6 - Fertilizers and Pesticides
April 2014 Tip #5 - Yard Care
March 2014 Tip #4 - Paint Diposal
February 2014 - Tip #3 - Illicit Discharge
January 2014 - Tip #2 - Motor Oil Disposal
December 2013 - Tip #1 - Household Hazardous Waste

 

Storm Water Pollution Prevention Video for Children

 

 

Storm Water Pollution Prevention Video

 

 

PI Secondary Water Will be Shut off on October 15th

WateringUtah is the 2nd driest state in the US based on state-wide average precipitation.

Due to the severe nature of the limited water situation this year, the City has established a 24-hr enforcement program. It is important that we each do our part to use water wisely and efficiently, and the City’s role is to remind water users of excess use. Let’s be Pleasant Grove PROUD in how we use water.

Proud to Be Water Wise Schedule
Pleasant Grove City requires residents to strictly follow a watering schedule by house number:

Odd: Monday, Wednesday, Friday
Even: Tuesday,Thursday, Saturday
Sunday – Certain Large Users (churches, schools, and city services), No Residential Watering


Free Water Check
801-785-5045


Water Conservation Websites:

http://conservewater.utah.gov
http://www.slowtheflow.org
http://www.conservewater.utah.gov/WhyConserve/
http://waterwiseutah.org
http://www.cuwcd.com
http://www.cuwcd.com/publicinformation/conservation.htm
http://utahwaterconservationforum.org/
http://www.jvwcd.org/
http://www.slowtheflow.org/index.php
http://www.utahcountyonline.org/Dept/exten/Horticulture/Sprinkler.asp
http://www.centralutahgardens.org/
http://naturalresources.utah.gov/divisions/water-resources.html
http://www.water.utah.gov/

Water Graph
March:
No irrigation recommended

April:
No irrigation recommended

May:
21 minutes every 4 days

June:
21 minutes every 3 days

July:
21 minutes every 3 days

August:
21 minutes every 3 days

September:
21 minutes every 3 days

October
No irrigation recommended

November
No irrigation recommended

December

No irrigation recommended

In order to protect the quality of storm water within Pleasant Grove City, the Council has adopted ordinances and the storm water managmenet plan (document link below). Residents can assist in keeping storm water clean by not disposing of waste materials in gutters (e.g. leaves and grass clipings), sweeping up sidewalks and gutters, washing cars on the lawn, and reporting those who pollute (illicit discharge) the City storm drain system.  All curbs and roadway shoulders, along with curb collection boxes and the underground pipes are part of the City storm drain system.  Keeping these clean helps keep our local streams, Utah Lake, the Jordan River, and the Great Salt Lake clean and useful for all.

Management Plan Document
Pleasant Grove Storm Water Management Plan
Pleasant Grove Storm Water Management Plan – 2016 Update – Draft
Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Storm Water Program Small MS4 Report Form

 

Report an Illicit Discharge (Storm Water Pollution/Dumping)
To report pollution or dumping of any material in the storm drain system, please call 801-785-2941 (Mon-Thur 6:30-4:00, Fri 6:30-10:00am) or 801-420-0554 (after hours). You may also use our online form.

Construction Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)
SWPPP's for development projects (subdivisions and commercial or multi-family housing sites) are presented and approved through the development process.  Use the Utah DEQ's template for preparing the SWPPP found on their website (LINK). The document is titled "Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) Template: Authorized States (Appendix A)".

SWPPP's for individual single family lots are submitted and approved with the building permit. The City form (Click here for form) should be downloaded, completed, and submitted with the building permit. Be sure to sign it.

General Questions
Quesions about the storm drain system may be called in to 801-785-2941 or you can use the online form.

Educational Materials
Each month we will post a new tip to help you learn about how to keep our storm water drains clean.

 

General guidelines - What Can You Do?

 

Storm Water Pollution Prevention Video

 

Storm Water Pollution Prevention Video for Children

 

MS4 Annual Reports
2009-2010 Report
2010-2011 Report
2011-2012 Report
2012-2013 Report

 

Download Water Quality Reports

2016 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

 

Protecting Your Drinking Water

By John Schiess, P.E., City Utility Engineer

Pleasant Grove obtains its culinary water supply from high quality wells and springs.  These sources are fed from snow-melt and rainwater infiltration into the ground up-gradient from the source.  The ground acts as a filter to natural surface contaminants in the management area contributing to the wells.  Water quality tests have shown this water to be of high quality, not requiring treatment other than chlorination of the springs before usage.  Ground water is susceptible to contamination from accidental or intentional contamination at the ground surface. Therefore, the City has developed a Drinking Water Source Protection Plan for its water sources to protect these sources from contamination.  As part of the City’s drinking water source protection program, the City will periodically include information about protecting the ground water in its monthly mailings.  Pleasant Grove City is dedicated to provide safe, clean, and reliable drinking water to its users and requests the public’s health in protecting their water supplies.

The Drinking Water Source Protection Plan for Pleasant Grove City is available for your review.  It contains information about source protection zones, potential contamination sources, and management strategies to protect our drinking water.  Potential contamination sources common in our protection area are residential, municipal, and educational landscaping chemicals, commercial fuel, oil, paint, resins, and other chemicals.  Additionally, our wells have a medium susceptibility to potential contamination.  We have also developed management strategies to further protect our sources from contamination.  Please contact us at 785-5045 of you have any questions or concerns about our source protection plan.

What is Household Hazardous Waste?

By Utah Dept. of Environmental Quality
Many hazardous products and chemicals such as cleaners, oils, and pesticides are used in the home every day.  When discarded, these products are called household hazardous waste (HHW). HHWs are discarded materials and products that are ignitable, corrosive, reactive, toxic, or otherwise listed as hazardous by the EPA. Products used and disposed of by a typical residence may contain more than 100 hazardous substances including  batteries, cleaners, cosmetics, fluorescent light bulbs, glues, heating oil, insecticides and pesticides, ink, medicines, motor oil and automotive supplies, paints, thinners, stains and varnishes, polishes, swimming pool chemicals, smoke detectors, thermometers, and fuel.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates the average American household generates 20 pounds of HHW each year.  As much as 100 pounds of HHW can accumulate in the home and remain there until the resident moves or undertakes a thorough “spring cleaning.”  Since the chemicals found in the HHW can cause soil and groundwater contamination, generate hazardous emissions at landfills, and disrupt water treatment; facilities are currently required to screen for HHW to avoid cooperating under restrictive hazardous waste laws.  Furthermore, many communities may be required to establish a HHW collection program in order to qualify for permits to manage storm water.

The best way to handle household hazardous materials is to completely use the product before disposing of the container.  If this is not possible, then the next alternative is to return unused portions to your community household hazardous waste clean-up day.  Keep products in their original package with all labels intact.  If the container is leaking, place it in a thick plastic bag.  Pack the products in a plastic-lined cardboard box to prevent leaks and breakage.  Household waste clean-up days are for household wastes only.  No industrial or commercial wastes and no containers larger than five gallons are accepted.  Explosives, radioactive material, and medical wastes are also unacceptable.

HHWs can be dangerous to people and pets who come in contact with them.  HHWs can endanger water supplies, damage sewage treatment systems, and cause other environmental damage.  Only use the products as directed.  DO NOT:  Flush HHWs down the toilet or pour them down the sink or storm drain or on the ground.  Contact your local health department or the Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste to determine whether your community has a household hazardous waste collection program.
Identify HHWs to reduce the amount of potentially hazardous products in your home and eliminate what you throw away by following these easy steps:

1.  Before you buy, read the labels and be aware of what they mean.  Also, look for these words on labels; they tell you what products my need special handling or disposal – “Caution, combustible, corrosive, danger, explosive, flammable, poison, toxic, volatile, and warning.” Select a product best suited for the job and buy only what you can use entirely.

After you buy, read label precautions and follow directions for safer use, recycle/dispose of empty containers properly, share what you can’t use with friends or neighbors, store properly, use recommended amounts (more is not necessarily better), and use the child-resistant closures and keep them on tightly.

For more information, please call Division of Solids and Hazardous Waste at 801-538-6170, Division of Drinking Water Source Protection Program at 801-536-4200, Environmental Hotline at 1-800-458-0145, or Sonja Wallace, Pollution Prevention Coordinator at 801-536-4477.

City Objective

Public Works Phone: 785-2941
For after hours problems please contact Police dispatch at 801-785-3506.

One of Pleasant Grove City Public Works' main objectives is to provide a plan for the safe movement of emergency equipment, vehicle traffic and pedestrians through the City. A snow removal plan has been developed to assist with this objective in order to maintain streets in hazardous weather conditions.
Pleasant Grove uses the following priorities to establish the urgency of snow removal within the city:

  1. All main arterials considered to be the minimum network which must be kept open to provide a transportation system connecting police/fire stations and rescue squad units.
  2. All remaining arterials, selected collectors, bus routes and around schools.
  3. All other selected collectors completing the network covering the major traffic volume streets and selected troubled areas such as intersections, and hills.
  4. All remaining streets, such as residential and local streets.
  5. Cul-de-sacs last. If cars are parked in a cul-de-sac, that cul-de-sac will not be plowed.


Resident Responsibilities

Resident Responsibilities

"Safety is everyone's responsibility."

Residents are required by ordinance to keep parked vehicles off the roads between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. each year from November 1st through March 15th. Swerving snow plows in and out of parked cars is dangerous, and the operators cannot make adequate passes on the streets. In addition, the City asks that there be no placing, dumping or pushing of snow into the streets or right-of-ways from the adjacent properties. Clear your sidewalks especially after the snow plows have finished plowing to the curb.

Salt and/or sand all icy areas both on the sidewalks, driveways, steps and pathways.
Try to assist your elderly and handicapped neighbors with their snow removal. When income allows, hire help.

Public Works FAQs

Q's and A's

Where I came from, the city plowed all the streets. Why not here?

As mentioned earlier, all the streets are plowed in a priority. When the main arterial streets are plowed for better transportation, then the residential ones are completed Sometimes' the snow continues to fall, much of the city's time is spent on the arterial streets, however the residential streets will be handled as soon as possible, thereafter.

Why not plow, to the center?

Piling snow in the center of a street can become a dangerous situation. Traffic is restricted. The freezing and thawing adds to pavement deterioration. Sight is obstructed and residents have problems entering and exiting their driveways.

Can't the City remove the snow they put in my' driveway?

If you consider the large number of driveways in the city, it's too costly and time consuming to use additional people and equipment to perform this service. Our primary duty is to open and keep open the main roadway system. Our crews try to keep this situation to a minimum.

Why do the plows go so fast and throw snow on my sidewalk?

Plows need to go a minimum speed in order to throw the snow off to the side. We ask our operators not to throw the snow any further than necessary.

Why don't your operators put the blade down and plow all the snow off, down to the pavement?

The street department uses gravity plows that can be mounted on the same trucks we use during the summer. These plows tend to ride on top of compacted snow. In addition, bare pavement snow removal tends to damage water valves, access structures, pavement markings and plows.

Contact Information

Contact Information

Public Works Main

Director: Marty Beaumont
Address: 323 West 700 South
Phone: 785-2941

Streets & Storm Drainage Division

Name: John Goodman
Office: 323 West 700 South
Phone: 785-2941

Water & Sewer Division

Name: Greg Woodcox
Office: 323 West 700 South
Phone: 785-2941

For after hours problems please contact Police dispatch at 801-785-3506.

Public Works Notices

Public Works Notices

Please Don't Feed the Storm Drain

Why should we care what goes down the storm drain? Well you have heard the old saying what comes around goes around. The same is true with what we put down the storm drain.

Things we can do:

  • Yard: Don't over fertilize. Sweep (do not wash) fertilizer and soil off driveways and walkways.
  • Car: Maintain your car to prevent oil leaks and recycle used motor oil and anti-freeze.
  • Pet: Pick up pet waste from yards, trails and sidewalks.
  • Home: Use non toxic or natural household cleaning products. Recycle or properly dispose of household chemicals.
Please help us keep our town clean, take pride in what we have. If each person does their part in keeping their own yards clean it makes a big difference.

Remember what goes down the drain affects all of us. Protect our natural resources, our vegetation and wildlife.

Drinking Water Quality Reports

Annual Drinking Water Quality Reports for 2016 are available for public download.

To view the reports and supplemental information please click the links below:

Allied Waste Holiday Service Schedule

Disposal sites in Utah County are closed on the following dates in 2015:

  • May 28
  • July 4
  • July 24
  • September 3
  • November 22
  • December 25
If your City service day(s) falls on or after this date in the same week, it will be pushed one day.

Examples: May 28th is a Monday. Monday's regular service will be serviced on Tuesday, Tuesday on Wednesday,..., Friday service will be done on Saturday.

November 22 is a Thursday. Monday through Wednesday of that week will be serviced as usual. Thursday will be serviced on Friday and Friday serviced on Saturday.

Understanding Your Water Bill

Understanding Your Water Bill

Do you know why the cost of utilities fluctuates over time and with the seasons? The City wants residents to better understand the charges on their utilities bill.

Here is some information you should know:

Download the May 2008 Water Bill Insert "Understanding Your Water Bill"

Storm Water Management Plan

Storm Water Management Plan


Updated Storm Water Management Plan available for review and comment.
Click here to view.

Protecting Your Drinking Water

PROTECTING YOUR DRINKING WATER

By John Schiess, P.E. City Utility Engineer

Pleasant Grove obtains its culinary water supply from high quality wells and springs. These sources are fed from snow-melt and rainwater infiltration into the ground up-gradient from the source. The ground acts as a filter to natural surface contaminants in the managen1ent area contributing to the wells. Water quality tests have shown this water to be of high quality, not requiring treatment other than chlorination of the springs before usage. Ground water is susceptible to contamination from accidental or intentional contamination at the ground surface. Therefore, the City has developed a Drinking Water Source Protection Plan for its water sources to protect these sources from contamination. As part of the City's drinking water source protection program, the City will periodically include information about protecting the ground water in its monthly mailings. Pleasant Grove City is dedicated to provide safe, clean. and reliable drinking water to its users and requests the public's health in protecting their water supplies.

The Drinking Water Source Protection Plan for Pleasant Grove City is available for your review. It contains inforn1ation about source protection zones, potential contamination sources, and management strategies to protect our drinking water. Potential contamination sources common in our protection area are residential, municipal, and educational landscaping chemicals, commercial fuel, oil, paint, resins, and other chemicals. Additionally, our wells have a medium susceptibility to potential contamination. We have also developed management strategies to further protect our sources from contamination. Please contact us at 785-5045 of you have any questions or concerns about our source protection plan.



What is Household Hazardous Waste?

By Utah Dept. of Environmental Quality

Many hazardous products and chemicals such as cleaners, oils, and pesticides are used in the home every day. When discarded, these products are called house- hold hazardous waste (HHW). HHWs are discarded materials and products that are ignitable, corrosive, reactive, toxic, or otherwise listed as hazardous by the EPA. Products used and disposed of by a typical residence may contain more than 100 hazardous substances including batteries, cleaners, cosmetics, fluorescent light bulbs, glues, heating oil, insecticides and pesticides, ink, medicines, motor oil and automotive supplies, paints, thinners, stains and varnishes, polishes, swimming pool chemicals, smoke detectors, thermometers, and fuel.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates the average American household generates 20 pounds of HHW each year. As much as 100 pounds of HHW can accumulate in the home and remain there until the resident moves or undertakes a thorough "spring cleaning." Since the chemicals found in the HHW can cause soil and groundwater contamination, generate hazardous emissions at landfills, and disrupt water treatment; facilities are currently required to screen for, HHW to avoid cooperating under restrictive hazardous waste laws. Furthermore, many communities may be required to establish a HHW collection program in order to qualify for pern1its to manage storm water.

The best way to handle household hazardous materials is to completely use the product before disposing of the container. If this is not possible, then the next alternative is to return unused portions to your community household hazardous waste clean-up day. Keep products in their original package with all labels intact. If the container is leaking, place it in a thick plastic bag. Pack the products in a plastic- lined cardboard box to prevent leaks and breakage. Household waste clean-up days are for household wastes only. No industrial or commercial wastes and no containers larger than five gallons are accepted. Explosives, radioactive material, and medical wastes are also unacceptable.

HHWs can be dangerous to people and pets who come in contact with them. HHWs can endanger water supplies, damage sewage treatment systems, and cause other environmental damage. Only use the products as directed. DO NOT: Flush HMW’s down the toilet or pour down the sink or storm drain or on the ground. Contact your local health department or the Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste to determine whether your community has a household hazardous waste collection program.

Identify HHWs to reduce the amount of potentially hazardous products in your home and eliminate what you throwaway by following these easy steps: 1. Before you buy, read the labels and be aware of what they mean. Also, look for these words on labels; they tell you what products my need special handling or disposal -"Caution, combustible, corrosive, danger, explosive, flammable, poison, toxic, volatile, and warning. "Select a product best suited for the job and buy only what you can use entirely.

After you buy, read label precautions and follow directions for safer use, recycle/dispose of empty containers properly, share what you can't use with friends or neighbors, store properly, use recommended amounts (more is not necessarily better), and use the child-resistant closures and keep them on tightly.

For more information, please call Division of Solids and Hazardous Waste at 801- 538-6170, Division of Drinking Water Source Protection Program at 801-536- 4200, Environmental Hotline at 1-800-458-0145, or Sonja Wallace, Pollution Prevention Coordinator at 801-536-4477.

Use of Secondary Water

The City will start filling the secondary water system around April 11th. This process generally takes a few weeks to get all of the air out of the system and begin properly providing water. Everyone is being asked to wait until May 1st to start watering. The following is the recommended watering procedure:

  1. Please check your valve to make sure that is has been turned off from the winter months.
  2. Open your valve slowly to check for leaks and broken pipes.
  3. If you have a broken pipe it was most likely frozen throughout the winter months.

Due to the ongoing drought we will continue this year with a watering schedule. If your house number is odd your watering days are Mon., Wed., and Fri. If your house number is even your watering days are Tues., Thurs., and Sat. We will be monitoring water usage for noncompliance to watering days and wasting water again this year. Compliance officers will be working around the clock. Please adhere to your days and conserve where you can.

What do I do if I have a sewer, water, or other emergency after hours?

Call Police Dispatch at (801) 785-3506.

How do I change the sewer and water service into my name?

Call City Hall at (801) 785-5045.

When will secondary water be available for me?

Call the Public Works Department. All areas are scheduled to be completed by 2008. A schedule map is available at the Public Works shop. (323 West 700 South).

How do I sign up for secondary water?

Go to City Hall and pay the hook-up fee of $100. Have a professional hook up your line to the secondary water service, or do it yourself. To help keep our drinking water clean and safe, call the Water Department at 785-2941 to have your hook-up inspected. Don't bury the line until we have inspected it.

I have no water pressure. What can I do?

Call the Water Department ((801) 785-2941) and ask to have it checked. Often this is a pressure regulator in your home going bad. Have it checked by a plumber.

How do I get curb and gutter put in on a street or in front of my yard?

It's the homeowner's responsibility to put in curb and gutter. The homeowner needs to go to the Community Development Department or Public Works for more information. Call a contractor to install the curb and gutter.

Why don't I have any pressure with my secondary water?

Secondary water is dirty water with debris that clogs filters and sprinkler heads. This filter needs to be cleaned regularly. The filter is usually in the box near your secondary water connection.

Who do I call to get a water leak fixed?

Call the Water Department at (801) 785-2941 and they will check out the leak. If the leak is on the street side of the water meter, the Water Department will fix the leak. If the leak is on the house side of the meter, the homeowner is responsible to fix the leak or call a professional for help.

How do I turn off the water to my house?

Most houses have a valve just inside the house where the water line comes in. If you need to turn your water off at the meter call the Water Department at (801) 785-2941. Except in an emergency, do not try turning the water off at the meter yourself. It is against the law to tamper with the meter and meter box.

My sewer is backed up. What should I do?

  • Call the Sewer Department at (801) 785-2941. Call a plumber for problems between the house and the sewer main. Call the Sewer Department at (801) 785-2941 for mainline back-ups.

Sewer backed up? Here's what to do. If a backup occurs, first take action to protect people and valuable property. You may call the City or special service district at (801) 785-2941. As a service, we will check the main sewer. Any blockage found in the main lines will be promptly cleared. If the main line is not blocked, we recommend that you call a plumbing or sewer contractor to check your lateral line. Maintenance and repair of the lateral serving the home is the owner's responsibility. Regardless of the location of the blockage, clean up of the home should be done as soon as possible to minimize damage and possible negative health effects. There are qualified local businesses that specialized in this type of clean up.

Backup Prevention

Taking notice of what is flushed down toilets and sinks can prevent most backups. DO NOTflush the fol- lowing materials (or similar items) down toilets/drains. These items can plug the main and cause damage to you and other property owners connected to the main.

  • Large quantities of toilet paper
  • Paper towels
  • Feminine napkins
  • Disposable diapers
  • Clothing, socks, underwear
  • Plastic, metal, wood, etc.
  • Large quantities of cereals or grains (they can swell with water)
  • Live seeds, beans and peas (they may sprout)
  • Grease, fats or oils
  • Sand
  • Fibrous materials (cotton balls, hair, rags, cigarette butts...)
  • Sponges, scouring pads
Section 715 of the International Plumbing Code requires installation of a back water valve on drains to plumbing fixtures that are below the next manhole upstream from the building. If you do not have such a device, have one installed. Insurance Many homeowners'policies exclude sewer backups, but this coverage often can be added. You should contact your insurance agent for detail.

I want to dig. Who should I call?

Call Blue Stakes at 811. This is a free service.

I hit a pot hole and got a flat tire or damage to my car. Who should I call?

Call Public Works ((801) 785-2941) and report where the pot hole is so we can get it filled in. Call your insurance company and mechanic to take care of your repairs.

My sidewalk has a trip hazard. What should I do?

Call Public Works ((801) 785-2941). We will grind it down if possible. If it is too large to grind, then the sidewalk will need to be replaced by the homeowner, and the city will participate in the cost.

How hard is the water in Pleasant Grove?

Battlecreek Well, East of 500 East and South of 1800 North 14.6 grains per gallon. Monson Well, West of 500 East and South of 1800 North 17.5 grains per gallon. Manila Water, North of 1800 North 28.7 grains per gallon.

City Meeting Minutes

Community Events

Current Newsletters

Pleasant Grove Newsletter - Get the Latest News Here

Need past newsletters? Click here.

Meeting Agendas

Pleasant Grove City History

Did you know that Pleasant Grove was once called Battle Creek?

Three Year Road Plan

Water Conservation FAQ

Water Conservation FAQ

What is the current watering schedule?

Odd numbered houses and businesses: Mo-We-Fr
Even numbered houses and businesses: Tu-Th-Sa
Sundays: City and School District

Why do I see the City and others watering on Sundays?

In order to keep our system balanced, we is better to have some water usage on Sundays. We don’t allow residential or businesses to water, but allow some of the larger users (City and School District) to use the water.

Why does it seem that the City waters every day of the week?

Because of the size of some parks and the cemetery, the City will water a different part of the park and cemetery each day. While it may appear that the same piece of grass is being watered each day, it is actually watering the same piece of grass about once a week.

What are the watering violations that could result in a fine?

1. Watering on the wrong day
2. Wasting water
    a. Overwatering- Keeping sprinklers on too long
    b. Watering while it is raining
3. Watering on Sunday

What are the penalties for a watering violation?

First offense: Warning
Second offense: Disconnection from the secondary water system and $50 reconnect fee
Third offense: Disconnection from secondary water system and $200 reconnect fee
Reconnecting after shutoff: If property owner reconnects themselves to the secondary water system after being shut off by the City, a $500 penalty will be enacted in addition to any criminal action may be enforced.

What is the recommended watering time for my lawn?

Please use the following link to ascertain what the recommended watering time is. It varies on a weekly basis depending on the weather:

http://www.conservewater.utah.gov/guide.html

I was told that when the secondary water system went in that I’d be able to use all the water I wanted to and that the price wouldn’t go up.

We’ve heard a few residents make this comment. While I can’t speak to what was said in the past, our reality is that (1) we have a limited resource when it comes to water so we don’t have the luxury of allowing everyone to use as much as they want and (2) an analysis of the secondary water rates was done in 2010 that showed if there wasn’t a rate increase the water fund would be bankrupt in a couple of years. Therefore corresponding rate increases were put in to make sure the water fund stayed solvent.

How much water does the City have?

The City has water rights for enough water to operate the system each year. Depending on the amount of snow in the mountains determines how many of these water rights we are allowed to exercise. On a good snow year we are able to exercise 100% of our water rights if needed. In a drought year, we are allocated a portion of our water rights because their simply isn’t enough physical water to exercise all the water rights. For this reason a watering schedule is put into place to help conserve that water.

If the residents can water as much as they want on their allotted days, then are we really conserving water?

We are asking each citizen to limit their water usage on the days they are allowed to water. It defeats the purpose of conservation if our citizens have the attitude that they will overwater on the days they are allowed to water. Overwatering is a violation of our ordinance and subject to a citation. This really is a community effort to work together to conserve water.

Are we currently in a drought?

This is the third straight year that we aren’t receiving our full water allotment. Therefore we are asking residents to conserve water wherever possible. The City has enough water to last throughout this whole year if we have cooperation on conservancy. If we continue to run our sprinklers longer than we need to or water during a rainstorm, then we run the risk of not having enough water to last the whole year.

We got all this rain in May. Is the drought over?

The rain in May was heaven sent this year. It doesn’t signal the end of the drought because it wasn’t able to be stored as snow pack. The drought is really based on the amount of snow pack we get during the winter. The positive that the rain provided was that we used a small amount of our stored water during that month which helps with availability at the end of the year. But even with the rain we can’t be less diligent on water conservation.

What if my neighbor is watering too much or on the wrong days?

Please contact our Public Works Department at (801) 785-2941 and we will investigate it. You can remain anonymous throughout the process.

Why does the City allow more development when we have a water shortage?

Each new development is required to deed the amount of water their new development will use to the City.

Why isn’t secondary water metered?

At this point the secondary water system hasn’t been metered. When the system was installed, the technology for secondary water meters was lacking. The technology is much better now and putting in secondary water meters in now an option for consideration. The hold back at this point is the capital cost of installing the meters. It will cost $5.5M in order to install secondary water meters in the city. Right now, there isn’t a budget allocation for the installation of the meters.

Would we save water if we metered secondary water?

Before secondary water meters were installed, residents had to use culinary water to irrigate their lawns. This culinary water was metered. When the water was metered the usage was 3 gallons per minute per acre in the city. Now that the secondary water isn’t metered our usage has gone up to 7.5 gallons per minute per acre. That number shows that if secondary water was metered, we’d see a more concerted effort for residents to conserve water.

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